Monthly Archives: August 2016

The 5 Hardest Things about the New School Year

Community Autism Resources is pleased to have a Guest Blogger this month.

Matt O’Keefe provides his perspective on returning to school.

Matt O’Keefe is a freelance writer whose clients include a vocational school for those with learning differences Minnesota Life College, personal development site Lifehack and entertainment news blog The Beat. Visit mattwritesstuff.com for news and musings.

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Starting up school again is daunting for a lot of students. They’re transitioning from a system that they slowly grew accustomed to over nine months, followed by a summer off, to now face a brand new status quo. Having learning differences compounds the struggles of a new school year, which is why parents of young adults who have them should be aware of what their loved ones are going to have to learn to deal with. Here are five changes students, like the ones at the vocational school Minnesota Life College I write for, will experience in a new school year, as well as some quick tips on how to handle them.

  1. New teachers

What kind of teachers they have drastically impacts how well students with learning differences will adjust to the new school year. One possible strategy for making that adjustment as smooth as possible is to be very open about your loved one’s learning differences. If you have any control over the selection of the teachers, look for people sympathetic to your plight. If you don’t, at least let the teachers know what kinds of things they’ll need extra help with. Not all students and parents need to have a close relationship with their teachers, but you and your young adult likely will.

  1. New schedules

In a single school day students typically have to go to around five or six different classrooms. Students with LD will often struggle to remember where to go and when. The solution to this problem is a pretty simple one: writing it down. Your loved one can use a notecard, piece of paper, phone, etc., to record when and where their classes are. If needed, you can even help your young adult draft a map of the inside of the school.

  1. New subjects

Every year of high school usually sees some kind of change to the curriculum. The hope is that teachers will take the time to introduce students to new subjects at a manageable pace and make the material exciting for them, but that isn’t always the case. If your loved one is struggling to get a handle or interest on the new subject, you can teach it to them with something other than the assigned textbook. For example, if your young adult is struggling with Biology class, show them Planet Earth. Give them something that gets them excited or invested in what they’re learning.

  1. New social groups

Possibly the most difficult change for students with LD that occurs each quarter or semester is the change to the group of classmates they’re paired with. That frequent mix up means new social situations on a regular basis. There sadly isn’t much you can do to manage this other than teach your young adult the social schools to befriend or at least get along with the people they’re sharing a class.

  1. Increased responsibilities

Moving up a grade generally means that you’re going to have more homework, increasingly difficult tests and all kinds of other challenges. Hopefully the incline isn’t too steep, but if your young adult is having trouble keeping up with their new responsibilities there are a few options out there for you. You can remove parts of their schedule that aren’t as paramount as education, like extracurriculars. You can take advantage of tutor programs. Or, again, you can open up a stream of communication with your young adult’s teachers to learn directly from the source what will benefit the student.

A new school year isn’t always a smooth transition. For someone with learning differences it rarely is. Hopefully this list does something to help prepare you for it!